TUTORIAL – Baking out UVProject into a UVMap in Blender!

blog, Resources, tutorials

I love Blender…

But sometimes they way it does things leads a little to the imagination.

Take converting a UV projection to a UVMap, it should be a one, maybe two click operation.

It’s not.

You need to create a UVMap for your object and then another for the original projection and then you have to make sure that the Projection UV is active, but you have to have the UVMap selected as well… It’s overly complex.

But, once you know it, it’s quick to achieve.

On occasion, this rambling 14 minutes sounds a bit off, but watch along and you’ll get the idea! Take care and speak to you soon!

Take a look at the video below to find out more. Better still, subscribe to the channel and you’ll see a new one of these every week. Sometimes a “One by One” where we talk about what each part of blender does – at the moment we are concentrating on modifiers – other times tutorials on specific things or quick tips to make your life easier.

You want to see something not here? Then let me know in the comments. I’m always keen to help out where I can.

Take care and stay safe.

TUTORIAL: Fspy and UVProject in Blender! – making photoreal scenes with little effort that look ace!

blog, Resources, tutorials

I love Blender…

And I tell people a lot about how much it can do. Yet, People often think it doesn’t do the same sort of stuff that people can do in Maya and 3DSMax in regards to TV quality visuals.

A lot of visuals are faked by using real photographs. Guess what? Blender can do that too.

So on this tutorial, we talk about two things, Fspy and UVProject. Fspy is a free, open source software that creates a camera and it’s position from the vertical and horizontal planes in our picture and exports them into Blender via an addon that you get when you get the software. And UVProject is a modifier – see I’m still all about the modifiers – that makes the UV mapping for your shader correspond with the view from your camera.

Couple these two together, and you can quickly create scenes that would take forever to build and shade.

And Hollywood has been using this process for years to make environments seem real.

You can find out more about Fspy here:

https://fspy.io/

The photo used in this tutorial has come from unsplash

https://unsplash.com/photos/K5sjajgbTFw

And the person who photographed it is Nolan Issac:

https://unsplash.com/@nolanissac

Take a look at the video below to find out more. Better still, subscribe to the channel and you’ll see a new one of these every week. Sometimes a “One by One” where we talk about what each part of blender does – at the moment we are concentrating on modifiers – other times tutorials on specific things or quick tips to make your life easier.

You want to see something not here? Then let me know in the comments. I’m always keen to help out where I can.

Take care and stay safe.

Tips and Tricks: Painting in Krita, Making Planks semi-procedurally and adding IES lights to Blender

animation, blog, Resources, tutorials

I love Blender…

I think I have made that pretty clear in the last 22 videos.

But I also love Krita, a free open source painting application that has some amazing tools in it. So today we’re starting with a very quick fix of Krita, where I show you how to use it to make a texture tile using the wrap-around feature and a clone brush. Like Photoshop, but the tools got there first in Krita!

You can download it at:

https://krita.org/en/

The photo we use in it is by Pandav Tank who supplies free photographs anyone can use at Unsplash.com. https://unsplash.com/@pandavtank

Unsplash is a free-to-use, attribution required website that allows photographers to get there photos out in the world so people can use them on projects for free. It’s superb.

https://unsplash.com/

Following this we load this into Blender and add it to the floor shader and go through the motions of making a plank shader procedurally, albeit with a texture to work with first.

Lastly we get to talk about IES lights. These are mathematical models of actual lights, giving accurate falloffs and light looks perfect for Archvis work.

For a massive amount of IES profiles, go to: https://ieslibrary.com/en/browse

Take a look at the video below to find out more. Better still, subscribe to the channel and you’ll see a new one of these every week. Sometimes a “One by One” where we talk about what each part of blender does – at the moment we are concentrating on modifiers – other times tutorials on specific things or quick tips to make your life easier.

You want to see something not here? Then let me know in the comments. I’m always keen to help out where I can.

Take care and stay safe.